You are viewing an archived copy of this website captured Mon Nov 05 11:31:59 AEDT 2012

All Content © CRC for Forestry 2007

Sharing experience in developing a eucalypt resource with New Zealand foresters

bradnz-group

From top to bottom:

Australian speakers at the NZ workshop from left to right: Michael Henson (PÖyry Pty Ltd), David Bush (CSIRO), Chris Harwood (CSIRO, CRCF), Jane Medhurst (CRCF), Philip Smethurst (CSIRO, CRCF), David Lee (USC and Qld DEEDI), Brad Potts (UTAS, CRCF), Merv Shepherd (SCU, CRCF), Chris Beadle (CSIRO, CRCF) and David Cliffe (Narrowmine Transplants).  Tim Wardlaw (FT, CRCF) was unable to attend the meeting but made his presentation and answered questions via a Skype video link.

Brad Potts (CRC for Forestry) met up with former colleagues Luis Apiolaza and Heidi Dungey at the NZ workshop.  Luis worked with the CRC for Sustainable Production Forestry as a quantitative geneticist and is now a senior lecturer in the New Zealand School of Forestry at the University of Canterbury. Heidi did her PhD (UTAS, School of Plant Science) on eucalypt genetics in the first forestry CRC (CRC for Temperate Hardwood Forestry) and is now Acting Science Leader (Genetics) with Scion in New Zealand.

One of three family trials of Eucalyptus bosistoana established under the NZ Dryland Forests Initiative to develop a resource of eucalypts that produce high value naturally durable hardwoods.  This trial is at Cravens Road in the Marlborough District at the northern end of the south island of New Zealand and was planted in October 2009.  It included 67 open-pollinated seed lots collected from individual trees growing across the natural range of Eucalyptus bosistoana in Australia.

Treated pine posts are widely used for trellising in vineyards which are widespread in the Marlborough District of New Zealand.  However the treated pine posts are often broken during mechanical harvesting operations and, due to the chemical preservatives used in their treatment, there are issues associated with the disposal of these posts.  Dry country eucalypts which produce naturally durable posts are being explored as an alternative to treated pine. Eucalyptus bosistoana is one of the main species being tested. Other species of Eucalyptus that produce durable heartwood wood that are being tested in species trials include E. argophloia, E. quadrangulata, E. globidea, E. camaldulensis, E. cladocalyx, E. macroryncha and E. sphaerocarpa.

Six CRC scientists were invited to speak at workshop in New Zealand on “Developing a eucalypt resource” held on 3rd & 4th Nov 2011 (read more).  The workshop was coordinated by the Wood Technology Research Centre at School of Forestry, University of Canterbury and hosted by the Marlborough Research Centre and the New Zealand Drylands Forests Initiative. 

The workshop explored issues that should considered where a new species is to be introduced outside its natural range.  While the issues are general, the organisers of the workshop had a special interest in naturally durable eucalypts suited to New Zealand drylands.

A 158 page edited book was produced from papers written by the presenters:

Developing a eucalypt resource : learning from Australia and elsewhere. (Ed. J. Walker). Wood Technology Research Centre, University of Canterbury, New Zealand. ISBN 978-0-473-19896-1

An interesting overview on selecting and breeding eucalypts for natural durability was provided by David Bush (CSIRO) (read more).

Papers written and presented by CRC scientists include:

Potts B, Hamilton M, Blackburn (2011) Genetics of Eucalypts: Traps and Opportunities.  In ‘Developing a eucalypt resource: learning from Australia and elsewhere’. (Ed. J. Walker). pp. 1-26. Wood Technology Research Centre, University of Canterbury, New Zealand. (read more)

Harwood C (2011) Introductions: doing it right. In 'Developing a eucalypt resource: learning from Australia and elsewhere'. (Ed. J Walker) pp. 43-54. (Wood Technology Research Centre, University of Canterbury: Christchurch, New Zealand) (read more)

Shepherd M (2011) Early decisions in eucalypt domestication; species delineation, geographic variation and outbreeding depression. In 'Developing a eucalypt resource: learning from Australia and elsewhere'. (Ed. J Walker) pp. 67-76. (Wood Technology Research Centre, University of Canterbury: Christchurch, New Zealand) (read more)

Beadle C, Medhurst J, Forrester D (2011) Linking silvicultural management to solid-wood values. In 'Developing a eucalypt resource: learning from Australia and elsewhere'. (Ed. J Walker) pp. 77-92. (Wood Technology Research Centre, University of Canterbury: Christchurch, New Zealand) (read more)

Smethurst P (2011) Genotype-matching and managing for abiotic constraints: dryland eucalypts for the South Island. In 'Developing a eucalypt resource: learning from Australia and elsewhere'. (Ed. J Walker) pp. 93-104. (Wood Technology Research Centre, University of Canterbury: Christchurch, New Zealand) (read more)

Wardlaw T (2011) Managing biotic risks. In 'Developing a eucalypt resource: learning from Australia and elsewhere'. (Ed. J Walker) pp. 105-124. (Wood Technology Research Centre, University of Canterbury: Christchurch, New Zealand) (read more)






Biobuzz issue fifteen, December 2011