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Value of Production

6.1. VALUE OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION
The gross value of agricultural production in 2002 was $903 million, up 20 per cent from the previous year (Figure 15). The relatively high value for 2002 was a result of record milk and poppy production and price, and high beef and lamb prices.

Gross value of agricultural production is essentially an ex farm value of production estimate, and as such, does not include any multiplier effects associated with agriculture - including downstream processing and manufacturing. A multiplier of around three is normally accepted for agriculture in Tasmania, so the total value of agriculture to Tasmania is likely to be approximately $2,710 million.

On this basis, in 2001 the $755 million total gross value of agricultural production would have represented a total of $2,265 million or around 20 per cent of the total Gross State Product in that year.

There has been a steady increase in the gross value of agricultural production over time (5.2 per cent each year compound since 1984-85). When the annual figures are adjusted for inflation the increase over time is reduced somewhat, but there has a slight upward trend since 1990.

The increase in value evident in the late 1980s was a result of the increase in wool production and wool price prior to the demise of the reserve price scheme that was in place at the time.


Figure 16: Gross Value of Agricultural Production
 Figure 16: Gross Value of Agricultural Production

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Cat No. 7503.0, Value of Agricultural Commodities Produced, Australia

Currently, milk (24 per cent), livestock slaughterings (21 per cent), and vegetables (19 per cent) are the main components of the total gross value of agricultural production (Figure 17).

Wool makes up around 10 per cent of the total gross value compared to 26 per cent in 1990.

Figure 17: Gross Value of Agricultural Production, 2002
 Figure 17: Gross Value of Agricultural Production, 2002

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Cat No. 7503.0, Value of Agricultural Commodities Produced, Australia

Since 1985, the largest dollar increase has been for milk and vegetables. The largest per centage increase has been for "Other Crops" which includes poppies (Table 34).

Table 34 Increase in Gross Value of Agricultural Production, Tasmania
1985 to 2002

 Table 34 Increase in Gross Value of Agricultural Production, Tasmania

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Cat No. 7503.0, Value of Agricultural Commodities Produced, Australia (Appendix 5)

6.2. VALUE OF FORESTRY PRODUCTION
There is no Australian Bureau of Statistics publication that sets out the ex forest or plantation gross value of forestry production along the lines of that described for agriculture in Section 6.1. In order to give an indication of the change in output for the forestry sector, Australian Bureau of Statistics time series data is summarised below for logs delivered and timber produced since 1985 (Table 35 and Figure 18 and Figure 19). Some recent stumpage prices for Tasmanian timber are also outlined.

The total volume of sawmilling logs delivered has been relatively stable over the period from 1985. In contrast the volume of logs delivered for pulp and paper manufacturing has fluctuated over time but with a general upward trend since the early 1990s (Figure 18). There are no figures available on woodchipping logs since 1991.

The figures presented relate to production from all forests not just from plantations. They include public and private production, native and plantation timber, and both hardwood and softwood.

Figure 18: Logs Delivered, Tasmania
Figure 18: Logs Delivered, Tasmania 

Source: See Table 35

 

As expected the amount of timber produced closely parallels the amount of logs delivered with a relatively flat level of production for milled timber and a fluctuating production of woodchips, but trending upwards since the early 1990s (Figure 19).

Figure 19: Timber Produced, Tasmania
Figure 19: Timber Produced, Tasmania 

Source: See Table 35


Table 35: Logs Delivered and Timber Produced
('000 Cubic Metres)

Table 35: Logs Delivered and Timber Produced
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, ABS data available on request, Tasmanian Statistical Indicators 1303.6.

It should be noted that the "Sawmilling" and "Milled Timber" statistics in Table 35 include veneers as well as sawn timber.


Table 36 shows a range of stumpage prices for timber harvested in Tasmania in 2002.

Table 36: Stumpage Price Ranges, Tasmania, 2002

 

Source: PrivateForests Tasmania, Tasmanian Market Information Update for Farm Forestry Number 4, June 2002


Based on Table 35 and Table 36 and depending on the proportion of the various timber types sold, the stumpage value of timber produced in Tasmania in recent years might be somewhere in the range of $100 million to $130 million.

Say  4 million m3 of pulp logs @  $15  $60 million
  1 million m3 of sawlogs @  $40-50 $40 - 50 million
  Total     $100 - 130 million

This is from all forests (native and plantation) and across all lands (private and State).

In 1999-00 the industry value added figure for the Wood and Wood Product Manufacturing sector was $399 million14. This is in addition to the ex forest gross value estimate above and hence cannot be directly compared with agriculture gross value of production figure. "Log Sawmilling and Timber Dressing" made up around 50 per cent of the total ($197.6 million) with the remainder coming from "Other Wood Product Manufacturing" and "Paper and Paper Product Manufacturing".

NOTES
14 Australian Bureau of Statistics, Manufacturing Industry Tasmania 1999-2000, Cat No. 8221.6, Dec 2001.