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Prohibited Activities

Tasmania has strict legislative and quarantine procedures designed to minimise accidental introductions of exotic plants and animals in order to protect native fisheries and the integrity of Tasmania's aquatic ecosystems. A number of these Prohibited Activities attract large fines of up to $25,000.

Tasmania has strict legislative and quarantine procedures designed to minimise accidental introductions of exotic plants and animals in order to protect native fisheries and the integrity of Tasmania's aquatic ecosystems. A number of these Prohibited Activities attract large fines of up to $25,000.

The following activities which, unless regulated, may result in the introduction of exotic fish into Tasmania and the inadvertent spread of exotic plants and animals throughout our waterways.

Live Bait

Live bait including all live fish, yabbies, mudeyes or frogs cannot be brought into Tasmania and remain prohibited imports. Bait fishers should also comply with the Angling Code including possession of and use of live bait in Tasmanian waters. Responsible fishing practices by all anglers will minimise the spread of exotic species.

Trout Restocking

Trout stocking in farm dams, rivers or lakes is regulated by the IFS and cannot be carried out without prior written authorisation from the IFS. Unauthorised stocking can attract heavy fines. It is also illegal to undertake any fish transfers including trout, natives, redfin, yabbies etc. into any waters (farm dams, creeks, rivers, lakes ) without the written authority of the IFS. Unauthorised translocation can attract heavy fines.

Aquarium Pets

Aquarium pets causing the greatest risk in Tasmania are those with cold water temperature tolerances or those carrying disease and parasites. Therefore regulation is by temperature and health status. Prohibited imports include all coldwater fish species and certain species of temperate water fish. Also prohibited are axolotls, turtles and freshwater crayfish. Fines of up to $10,000 can apply to illegal imports.

Aquaculture

Prohibited imports include trout and salmon, and all coldwater fish, molluscs and crustaceans; unauthorised imports can result in up to $10,000 in fines. All aquaculture operations must be licensed with the IFS. Operating without a licence can result in fines of up $15,000 and proponents should contact the IFS to discuss aquaculture opportunities in Tasmania.

Legislation

As some fish species have the potential to seriously damage the environment and displace native species, they have been declared 'controlled fish' under the Inland Fisheries Act 1995.  This applies to all species of mainland yabby (Cherax spp.), European carp and Gambusia holbrooki.  Under the Act it is illegal to import, release, transfer or have possession of yabbies or carp in Tasmania. Fines of up to $25,000 can be imposed pending the number of offences. Furthermore, provisions under the Inland Fisheries Act 1995 allows the IFS to regulate all freshwater fish, crustaceans, amphibian, mollusc, invertebrate and aquatic plant imports. All imports, whether for recreational, hobby or commercial purposes, must have the written authority of the IFS.

Illegal imports carry hefty fines of up to $25,000. It is also illegal to undertake any restocking or fish transfers including trout, natives, redfin, yabbies etc. into any waters (farm dams, creeks, rivers, lakes ) without the written authority of the IFS.