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Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service

Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service
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  • Government Organization
    Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service manages 19 national parks and nearly 800 reserves, more than 40% of the State.
    About
  1. Cape Pillar Track open during Eight Hour Day long weekend

    Helicopter operations associated with the construction of the Three Capes Track in the Tasman National Park will be suspended during the Eight Hour Day long weekend. As such, the Cape Pillar Track and the Arthurs Peak Track will be open from Friday 7 March through to Monday 10 March 2014. Construction work may still be underway and walkers must follow any directions given by track workers.
    Enquiries: Sam Lennox 0438 983 252
  2. Recent Posts by OthersSee All
    •  nice photos of Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service its plateau is actively nice and alive.
      3 hours ago
    •  Save the Tasmanian Devil Appeal is the official fundraiser for the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program. Public donations allow the Appeal to support key research and cutting-edge conservation projects all aimed at keeping the Tassie devil alive in the wild. Please like our page to stay updated on all our activities.
      3 · 4 hours ago
    •  The beauty and the beast of Cradle Mountain. We have so much enjoyed walking in the park, that we have been here twice during our 6 weeks on Tasmania. Thanks for the very well maintained walkes around Cradle Mountain.
      2 · Yesterday at 4:45pm
    •  https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.233523676835876.1073741828.233284300193147&type=1 Had a great weekend at Freycinet. Beautiful Place & a credit to the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service. Thank you humans!
      11 · March 2 at 2:23am
    • Louisa Schreiber
       Spotted Marsh Frog - this specimen displayed unusual behaviour/posture - falling over after jumping, each jump - which indicates that the deadly chytrid fungus has sadly also spread to our region. Photo taken mid-February 2014, Copping.
      1 · February 25 at 9:16pm
  3. The restoration work on Kitchen Hut on the Cradle Mountain plateau is progressing well. Fine weather has enabled continuous work on the historic hut over the past two weeks which has included strengthening the internal structure of the hut ...and replacement of worn shingles.

    With some work still to be done, bushwalkers are advised that the hut will remain closed until at least Monday the 10th of March. For further information please contact Parks and Wildlife Service, Cradle Mountain (03) 6492 1110.
    See More
    Photo: The restoration work on Kitchen Hut on the Cradle Mountain plateau is progressing well. Fine weather has enabled continuous work on the historic hut over the past two weeks which has included strengthening the internal structure of the hut and replacement of worn shingles. 

With some work still to be done, bushwalkers are advised that the hut will remain closed until at least Monday the 10th of March. For further information please contact Parks and Wildlife Service, Cradle Mountain (03) 6492 1110.
  4. White Beach Fire (5 photos)
    On Tuesday March 4, Parks & Wildlife and Tas Fire Service were called to a fire at White Beach on the Tasman Peninsula. The fire resulted from an escaped, un-permitted burn-off on private land. It was brought under control late in the day. Ground crews received helicopter support. (photos courtesy Quinton Turner)
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  5. New banners for Deal Island Museum

    Seven banners interpreting the stories and images of the Deal Island lighthouse will feature in the Kent Group Museum on Deal Island in Bass Strait, thanks to the Wildcare Inc group Friends of Deal Island....
    The new banners were made possible from funding by the Arts Tasmania Small Museums and Collections Program to develop the Kent Group Museum Interpretation Plan. The program provided the assistance of a roving curator and graphic designer. The museum, Tasmania’s most remote small museum, is located in the former superintendent’s cottage on Deal Island. The museum includes stories and images of some of Australia’s earliest maritime history. The Deal Island lighthouse dates from 1848 and is the highest lighthouse in the southern hemisphere.
    The five double-sided and two single-sided interpretation banners include stories and images of the lighthouse, the 1890 visit to the Kent Group islands by the Victorian Field Naturalists, the wreck of the Karitane, the ‘Erith Mob’ and works by artists Fred Williams and Philip Wolfhagen.
    The banners were launched last week at a function at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, attended by The Friends of Deal Island, Arts Tasmania, Parks and Wildlife Service, Wildcare Inc, Heritage Tasmania, Marine Heritage Tasmania, Tasmania Museum and Art Gallery, Small Museums Tasmania and descendants of lighthouse keeper families.
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    Photo: New banners for Deal Island Museum

Seven banners interpreting the stories and images of the Deal Island lighthouse will feature in the Kent Group Museum on Deal Island in Bass Strait, thanks to the Wildcare Inc group Friends of Deal Island.
The new banners were made possible from funding by the Arts Tasmania Small Museums and Collections Program to develop the Kent Group Museum Interpretation Plan.  The program provided the assistance of a roving curator and graphic designer. The museum, Tasmania’s most remote small museum, is located in the former superintendent’s cottage on Deal Island. The museum includes stories and images of some of Australia’s earliest maritime history. The Deal Island lighthouse dates from 1848 and is the highest lighthouse in the southern hemisphere. 
The five double-sided and two single-sided interpretation banners include stories and images of the lighthouse, the 1890 visit to the Kent Group islands by the Victorian Field Naturalists, the wreck of the Karitane, the ‘Erith Mob’ and works by artists Fred Williams and Philip Wolfhagen. 
The banners were launched last week at a function at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, attended by The Friends of Deal Island, Arts Tasmania, Parks and Wildlife Service, Wildcare Inc, Heritage Tasmania, Marine Heritage Tasmania, Tasmania Museum and Art Gallery, Small Museums Tasmania and descendants of lighthouse keeper families.
  6. Lake Barrington access road works

    The access road to the Lake Barrington rowing course was re-opened on 20 February following a $40,000 road works program by the Parks and Wildlife Service, just in time for the State Rowing Championships. ...

    PWS Parks and Reserves manager, Linda Overend said: “It is only a 4 km road, but it is very important to a number of local clubs and the Sheffield community, and we are pleased to now have this improved road standard for access and safety.”

    Works to the access road included; clearing drains, reconstruction of the road shoulder, asphalt repairs, new centre line, traffic signs and guideposts. This has significantly improved the standard of the road and safety for Rowing Tasmania members, interstate competitors and visitors.

    “We have already had very positive feedback about the road improvements from the rowing community,” Ms Overend said.
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    Photo: Lake Barrington access road works

The access road to the Lake Barrington rowing course was re-opened on 20 February following a $40,000 road works program by the Parks and Wildlife Service, just in time for the State Rowing Championships.  

PWS Parks and Reserves manager, Linda Overend said: “It is only a 4 km road, but it is very important to a number of local clubs and the Sheffield community, and we are pleased to now have this improved road standard for access and safety.” 

Works to the access road included; clearing drains, reconstruction of the road shoulder, asphalt repairs, new centre line, traffic signs and guideposts.  This has significantly improved the standard of the road and safety for Rowing Tasmania members, interstate competitors and visitors.   

“We have already had very positive feedback about the road improvements from the rowing community,” Ms Overend said.
  7. Gellibrand Point planned burn completed

    The Parks and Wildlife Service completed the first burn of its autumn fuel reduction burning program with a 77 ha burn at Gellibrand Point Nature Recreation Area near Opossum Bay. The burn was aimed ...at fuel reduction for property protection and to facilitate an Aboriginal heritage survey of the reserve.
    About 30 staff from the Parks and Wildlife Service Southern Region and Fire Crew were involved, as well as Tasmania Fire Service crews from South Arm. Seventeen fire equipped vehicles were used at the burn, including two heavy tankers. The burn was heavily resourced due to the size of the burn, the bounding properties and to allow for potential weather considerations.
    A list of PWS planned burns is available on the PWS website at www.parks.tas.gov.au.
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    Photo: Mark Monks and Kent McConnell check on the progress of the burn.
    Photo: A PWS fire fighter keeping the burn within the boundary.
    Photo: The burn was aimed at providing property protection for nearby homes.
    Photo: PWS staff (from left) Ian Cooling, Rod Watson, Kent McConnell and John Duggan do a final check of the burn plan.
  8. Planned burn today at Gellibrand Point Nature Recreation Area near Opossum Bay

    As part of the Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) fuel reduction burning program, a planned burn in the Gellibrand Point Nature Recreation Area near Opossum Bay, will be undertaken on Monday, 3 March 2014.

    The burn is the first of the PWS statewide planned burn program for 2014. PWS acting Southern Region manager, Justi...n Helmich said the burn will be approximately 77 hectares in size and the objective is fuel reduction for property protection and to facilitate an Aboriginal heritage survey of the reserve.

    “Our planned burns have been prioritised using our bushfire risk assessment tool, based on a computer mapping system. This has helped us to identify the areas within reserves with the biggest bushfire risk. This risk assessment tool is used to prioritise areas for fuel treatment,” said Mr Helmich.

    “While planned burns are aimed at being low-intensity, at times there will be significant smoke and flame height, and ash may result.

    “The reserve will be closed for public safety during the burn and afterwards until it is deemed safe for the public to access the burn area.”

    People with medical conditions are advised to have a personal plan for avoiding smoke from the burn. Further information about developing a plan is available on the Asthma Foundation website at: http://www.asthmatas.org.au/help-advice

    Further information about this burn is available by contacting the local PWS office on 6214 8100. A list of PWS planned burns is available on the PWS website at www.parks.tas.gov.au.
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  9. Looking for a reason to get out and about?

    Parks Week is just around the corner!
    Connect With Nature, 3-9 March 2014

    Parks Week is an annual celebration of the important role that our parks play in contributing to the health of our commun...ities. A range of formal and informal events take place across Australia and New Zealand during parks week - there is something for everyone.

    Parks Week aims to:

    •Highlight and celebrate the important role parks play - across people, communities, and the natural environment;
    •Encourage greater use of parks;
    •Celebrate the contribution that volunteers make to parks;
    •Promote the healthy parks, healthy people message;
    •Promote park management agencies and the work they do.

    Tasmania is renowned for its magnificent nature and wilderness experiences. Bushwalking opportunities are abundant. There are walking experiences for all – from short strolls to challenging wilderness treks. Head out to Tasmania’s picturesque parks and reserves during Parks Week and Connect With Nature.

    See our events page for more information and ideas.

    Go to www.parks.tas.gov.au/events
    See More
    Photo: Looking for a reason to get out and about?

Parks Week is just around the corner!
Connect With Nature, 3-9 March 2014

Parks Week is an annual celebration of the important role that our parks play in contributing to the health of our communities. A range of formal and informal events take place across Australia and New Zealand during parks week - there is something for everyone.  

Parks Week aims to:

•Highlight and celebrate the important role parks play - across people, communities, and the natural environment; 
•Encourage greater use of parks; 
•Celebrate the contribution that volunteers make to parks;
•Promote the healthy parks, healthy people message;
•Promote park management agencies and the work they do.

Tasmania is renowned for its magnificent nature and wilderness experiences. Bushwalking opportunities are abundant. There are walking experiences for all – from short strolls to challenging wilderness treks. Head out to Tasmania’s picturesque parks and reserves during Parks Week and Connect With Nature. 

See our events page for more information and ideas.

Go to www.parks.tas.gov.au/events
  10. Just reminding owners of our "Bird in the Hand" app not to use it to "call up" birds. This can disrupt the bird's social behaviour and may impact on their breeding success.
    Photo: Just reminding owners of our "Bird in the Hand" app not to use it to "call up" birds. This can disrupt the bird's social behaviour and may impact on their breeding success.
  11. Access to Ralph Falls and St Columba Falls on 27 February 2014

    The Break O’Day Council has advised motorists and residents that the Intake Bridge on Forest Lodge Road in Pyengana, will be closed to all traffic between 8.30am and 3.00pm on Thursday 27, February 2014 for bridge inspections and testing to be undertaken.

    Motorists visiting Ralph Falls, Ringarooma Road, are advised there will be no through road access available to Pyengana for the duration of these works.

    Access to Ralph Falls will be available via Ringarooma and access to St Columba Falls will be available via Pyengana.
  12. Evandale National Penny Farthing Championships and Village Fair provided great opportunity to Share the Wonder!

    Parks and Wildlife Service set up a stall at the Evandale National Penny Farthing Championships and Village Fair held on the we...ekend.
    More than 700 people including locals, interstate and international visitors were invited to Share the Wonder through a visit to the stall. Discovery Rangers John Bowden and Jess Fuller-Smith together with Ranger Clinton Downing were the human faces behind the stall and provided information and entertainment for the crowd of visitors.
    Clinton said wildlife specimens were a big draw card for the stall.
    “A menagerie of native Tasmanian animals, particularly 2 magnificent birds of prey, seemed to attract people to our stall. It was obvious visitors wanted to use this opportunity to get up close and personal with our native animals,” said Clinton.
    Visitors were encouraged to look, touch and ask questions about our magnificent and unique animals. A lot of photographs were taken of people posing with the majestic birds, the white-bellied sea eagle and the wedge-tailed eagle.
    Many locals had stories of close encounters with at least one of the native species on display. Some were surprised to hear that these animals are still common sights within reserves.
    Visitors had lots of questions about these animals with many a unique and strange fact revealed in the answers attesting to the uniqueness of Tasmania’s native wildlife. Questions often led to how people might see these animals in their natural habitat.
    Marketing officer Stella Rodriguez had organised a range of publications and information to be at hand to answer questions and give ideas about things to do and places to visit and they were all very popular.
    Many visitors were inspired and expressed a desire to further explore and get to know the wide range of parks and reserves around the state.
    Children were most enthusiastic, asked lots of questions and played the games offered led by John and Jess. They were rewarded for their attention and great questions with stickers and ink stamps, good reminders for when they got home about what they might find in a visit to parks and reserves.
    Fair organisers presented staff with the Best Stall award during the day which was a great surprise and welcomed recognition.
    See More
    Photo: John, Jess and Clinton were kept busy looking after visitors.
    Photo: A steady stream of visitors were attracted to the stall.
    Photo: Young and not so young enjoyed the animal specimens on display.
  13. We are proud to share the comments of a visitor to Tasmania's national parks who took part in our Discovery Ranger Program recently:

    "I have been traveling with my family around Australia ... and have to commend Tas Parks & Wildlife on the information you provide to your interstate visitors. We came over on the Spirit of Tassie and were lucky enough to have Ranger John and Ranger Jess on board to... talk to us about the different parks and animals in Tasmania. The enthusiasm John & Jess showed was so wonderful and truly infectious! We have thoroughly enjoyed visiting your National Parks and seeing some of the animals first hand. We were lucky enough to run into John & Jess again at the Evandale Penny Farthing Championship where we were again treated to their immense knowledge and passion for Tasmanian animals, Parks and Wildlife. Not only do I want to say thank you to John & Jess, but also to Tas Parks & Wildlife as you do a fantastic job promoting your parks! Having Rangers doing talks on The Spirit of Tassie is just genius! Other States could learn a thing or two from Tassie! So keep up the good work! We are going home with big smiles on our faces and will rave about Tassie to everyone!!
    PS. John & Jess ... are fantastic for the promotion of Tassie!! As our 10 year said 'Jess is like a Female Steve Irwin'! A true, honest compliment from a child! Jess is such an asset to Tassie Parks & Wildlife!! Hold on to her tight! "
    Kind Regards,
    Brigitte James
    See More
  14. Mersey River suspension bridge re-opens for walkers

    The maintenance work on the Mersey River suspension bridge which is used to access the Lees Paddock walking track in the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, has been completed, and the bridge is now open to walkers.
  15. The Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service has just released A Visitors Guide to Tasmania's Parks and Reserves in iBook format.

    The iBook guide covers all national parks and many popular reserves in Tasmania, complete with maps, access inform...ation, highlights and activities. It contains stunning photographic galleries by some of Tasmania's best photographers, as well as audio and video content.

    Tasmania's world-class system of national parks and reserves offers visitors a wide range of unique experiences amid a diversity of spectacular landscapes, from wild rivers and ancient forests to rugged mountains and magnificent coastlines. These areas protect a diversity of unique plants and animals, many found nowhere else on Earth.

    This book is available for download with iBooks on Mac or iPad, and with iTunes on your computer. Multi-touch books can be read with iBooks on your Mac or iPad.

    See the iTunes preview for further details and to download the iBook.

    https://itunes.apple.com/au/book/tasmanias-national-parks-reserves/id820748635?mt=11
    See More
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  16. The Franklin River Nature Trail in the Wild Rivers National Park has been temporarily closed due to dangerous trees.
    For further information, contact the Queenstown Office on (03) 6471 5923
  17. Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) staff on Maria Island were confronted with the dangers of a ghost nets (nets accidentally lost or deliberately discarded) to marine life when a net with hundreds of dead fish washed up on the shores of Shoal... Bay, at the southern end of Maria Island.
    The net was not a fishing net, but instead appeared to be similar to those placed on the top of fish farm pools or tanks to prevent birds and seals from preying on fish within the pools or tanks.

    Maria Island senior ranger Pete Lingard said the net may have been blown off a fish farm in the extreme winds of Sunday, 9 February, eventually washing up on Shoal Bay.

    “It may also have been a net used to protect a vegie garden, which was blown into the sea during the extreme winds.”

    Inside the net were an estimated 400 or more black-backed (cocky) salmon, a few mullet and at least one small draughtboard shark.

    The following day PWS staff joined with a Save the Tasmanian Devil team biologist and several volunteers, including contractors working on the Maria Island jetty project, to extract the fish from the net and remove the net from the beach. There were concerns about the island’s Tasmanian devils ingesting the net and fish, which may have been injurious or fatal to the animals.

    “Our beaches regularly receive many items of marine debris and nets and ropes have been found and cleaned up by Maria Island PWS staff in the past. This was the most significant ghost net fish kill that island staff have seen and dealt with,” Pete said.
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  18. Update on the Lake Burbury Fire and tracks affected

    The bushfire east of Lake Burbury, Queenstown, continues to smoulder on both sides of the Lyell Highwy in the Princess River Conservation Area and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage ...Area.

    It is not expected to burn actively in the foreseeable future based on forecast wet weather conditions. Smoke and fire are currently not affecting the Lyell Highway and it is open to traffic.

    The Nelson Falls Track and Frenchmans Cap Track are open.

    The walking route from Tahune Hut (on the Frenchmans Cap Track) to the Lyell Highway via Raglan Range and Irenabyss remains closed.

    People planning to walk or raft in nearby areas should check the Tasmania Fire Service website at www.fire.tas.gov.au for changes to the fire status.
    See More
  19. Notice to bushwalkers: the historic Kitchen Hut, on the Cradle Mountain Plateau, is undergoing some restoration and maintenance works. Access to the hut is not available from Sunday 16th February until Monday 3rd March. For more information please contact the Cradle Mountain Parks and Wildlife office on (03) 6492 1120.
    Photo: Notice to bushwalkers: the historic Kitchen Hut, on the Cradle Mountain Plateau, is undergoing some restoration and maintenance works. Access to the hut is not available from Sunday 16th February until Monday 3rd March. For more information please contact the Cradle Mountain Parks and Wildlife office on (03) 6492 1120.
  20. Looking after eagles on the Three Capes Track

    Exclusion zones around eagle nests on the Three Capes Track on the Tasman Peninsula are helping to protect wedge-tailed eagles and white-bellied sea eagles.
    At least seven young eagles fledg...ed among the eight active nests that have been monitored this breeding season.
    In the early stages of planning for the Three Capes Track, it was identified that the proposed track route included a number of areas with the strong likelihood of suitable nesting habitat for the both the white-bellied sea eagle and wedge-tailed eagle. The wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax subsp. fleayi)is listed as endangered under the Tasmanian Threatened Species Act and the white-bellied sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) as vulnerable.
    An aerial survey of the area of the Three Capes Track and nearby area was undertaken in 2008, as part of the assessment of environmental values. This targeted potential nesting habitat, inspected 10 previously known nests, and revealed five new eagles’ nests. Since 2011, the search area expanded to include several nests near to the Three Capes Track route, with 14 nests currently being monitored.
    When track construction began in 2012, exclusion zones for the nests were put in place. The exclusion zones take in a one-kilometre horizontal and vertical radius for helicopter activity and 500 metres for construction activity. The exclusion zones apply during the breeding season of 1 August to 31 January, which provides a six month window of undisturbed time for breeding and raising chicks.
    Eagle nest monitoring is done twice-yearly, via a fixed-wing plane, to see if the nests are still in place and being actively used, and to record breeding success.
    While the number of nests that are active has reduced slightly, at least seven fledging eagles have been counted among the eight active nests. Importantly, five of the successful nests were on the eastern side of the peninsula, where the helicopter operations were regularly occurring.
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    Photo: Looking after eagles on the Three Capes Track

Exclusion zones around eagle nests on the Three Capes Track on the Tasman Peninsula are helping to protect  wedge-tailed eagles and white-bellied sea eagles. 
 At least seven young eagles fledged among the eight active nests that have been monitored this breeding season.
In the early stages of planning for the Three Capes Track, it was identified that the proposed track route included a number of areas with the strong likelihood of suitable nesting habitat for the both the white-bellied sea eagle and wedge-tailed eagle. The wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax subsp. fleayi)is listed as endangered under the Tasmanian Threatened Species Act and the white-bellied sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) as vulnerable.
An aerial survey of the area of the Three Capes Track and nearby area was undertaken in 2008, as part of the assessment of environmental values. This targeted potential nesting habitat, inspected 10 previously known nests, and revealed five new eagles’ nests. Since 2011, the search area expanded to include several nests near to the Three Capes Track route, with 14 nests currently being monitored. 
When track construction began in 2012, exclusion zones for the nests were put in place. The exclusion zones take in a one-kilometre horizontal and vertical radius for helicopter activity and 500 metres for construction activity. The exclusion zones apply during the breeding season of 1 August to 31 January, which provides a six month window of undisturbed time for breeding and raising chicks.
Eagle nest monitoring is done twice-yearly, via a fixed-wing plane, to see if the nests are still in place and being actively used, and to record breeding success.
While the number of nests that are active has reduced slightly, at least seven fledging eagles have been counted among the eight active nests. Importantly, five of the successful nests were on the eastern side of the peninsula, where the helicopter operations were regularly occurring.