The Library at the End of the World – Media Update

cover_webComing soon!

The Library at the End of the World: Natural Science and its Illustrators will be available from bookshops from 17  October 2014. The Royal Society of Tasmania is offering you the chance to pre-purchase the volume at a discount. Both hard and soft cover versions will be available – the 1000 hardcover copies will be numbered and signed by the editors.

Science and Art come together in this lavishly-illustrated (over 200 high- quality pictures), 240 pp book which explores the natural history art to be found in The Royal Society of Tasmania’s Rare Book Collection.

Order on-line from our Publications page.

Listen to the radio interview with Ryk Goddard, Dr Margaret Davies and Dr Anita Hansen by clicking on the link below.

https://soundcloud.com/936-abc-hobart/the-royal-society-library-is-a-treasure-trove

 

See the Mercury Newspaper liftout of the book by clicking the link below.

http://www.mercurynie.com.au/documents/RoyalSocietyMERCURY27Aug2014p25COPYRIGHT.pdf

From spiny ant-eater to promiscuous spiky baby killer: an incomplete natural history of echidnas – December 3 2013

Christmas Lecture and Dinner

Associate Professor Stewart Nicol will present “From spiny ant-eater to promiscuous spiky baby killer: an incomplete natural history of echidnas.”

Biography

Associate Professor Stewart Nicol is an Honorary Research Associate with the School of Zoology at the University of Tasmania. After many years in the School of the Medicine, which included a period as Deputy Head of School and Associate Head of Medical Sciences, he transferred to the School of Zoology at the beginning of 2007. Although he formally retired at the end of 2012, he continues with an active research program: Stewart is a world-renowned expert on the biology of the monotremes (the platypus and echidnas).

Tuesday December 3, CSIRO Theatrette, Castray Esplanade, Hobart at 6.00pm

The lecture starts at 6.00 pm followed by a buffet dinner in the CSIRO canteen at 7.30pm.  Guests may attend the lecture only at no charge, however for security reasons registration is required.  The cost of the dinner is $35.00 payable by Monday 18th November.  Please contact the office for further details

 

 

 

Delving into the Soil Carbon Black Box – November 24th 2013

Dr Leigh Sparrow, Senior Research Fellow in Soil Science, Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, UTAS

will present  Delving into the Soil Carbon Black Box in the Meeting Room, QVMAG at Inveresk, 2.00 pm Sunday November 24th 2013

Abstract

By virtue of its cool temperate climate, Tasmania’s soils generally have high concentrations of carbon. Intensive farming, especially frequent cropping, causes carbon concentrations to decrease. Dr Sparrow will outline the principles which govern the amount of carbon expected for any particular combination of soil, climate and farming system, and show how these apply to current Tasmanian situations. The data provide cause for concern about sustainable farming and carbon sequestration in soil, but there is also some good news.

Biography

Dr Sparrow is a Senior Research Fellow in Soil Science with the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, University of Tasmania. With a background in soil fertility, Dr Sparrow’s early career focused on soil testing and fertiliser management, but he has also studied heavy metal contamination, irrigation management and soil-borne diseases. His recent research includes modelling and measuring changes in soil carbon in different farming systems, with the aim of assessing the capacity of the soil to sustain agriculture. Implications for carbon storage in soil have also been evaluated.

Admission: $5 General Public, $3 Friends of the Museum, $2 Students
Free for members of the Royal Society of Tasmania

To assist us with the organization of this event
RSVP by Thursday 21st November 2013:
Email bookings@qvmag.tas.gov.au or telephone 6323 3798

 

The Long Road Back from the Edge of Extinction – the Tasmanian Railway dilemma.

Robin Walpole
Chief Engineer,
Tasrail, Launceston, Tasmania

will present

The Long Road Back from the Edge of Extinction – the Tasmanian Railway dilemma.

in the Meeting Room, QVMAG at Inveresk
2.00 pm Sunday October 27th 2013
Admission: $5 General Public, $3 Friends of the Museum, $2 Students
Free for members of the Royal Society of Tasmania

To assist us with the organization of this event
RSVP by Thursday 24th October 2013:
Email bookings@qvmag.tas.gov.au or telephone 6323 3798

Tasmanian Railways have had a chequered history. This illustrated talk will shed some light on the historical context of the third failure of Tasmanian railways and the challenges of its survival in today’s context. It will discuss the conditions that led to the railway’s failure, the concept of The Owner of Last Resort, the gradual reconstruction process, and some of the challenges in overcoming past compromises. Many interesting photographs will accompany this enlightening journey into Tasrail’s history.

Robin Walpole is currently the Chief Engineer of Tasrail and brings to the position extensive experience in railway infrastructure throughout Australia, SE Asia and Africa. Prior to coming to Tasrail he was working on the rehabilitation of Third World narrow gauge railways in Africa.

Announcement of Awards for 2013

The Royal Society of Tasmania proudly announces that nominations are now being called for:  The Royal Society of Tasmania Medal  The Clive Lord Memorial Medal, and  The M  R  Banks Medal.

 

  • The Royal Society of Tasmania Medal  was established in 1927. It  is awarded to a scholar for substantial original research in any subject within the Society’s purview. A significant part of the research shall have been conducted while the recipient was a resident of Tasmania. The recipient must have been, in the view of the Council, an active member of the Society for at least five years. The awardee will deliver “The Royal Society of Tasmania Medal Lecture”.
  • The purpose of the  M R Banks Medal, established March 1997, is to recognise outstanding achievement by a scholar in mid-career, no more than 45 years of age.

The conditions of the award are:

  1. The scholar to be recognized must be no more than 45 years of age at the date of the Award, and should have achieved a PhD or appropriate higher qualification.
  2. The award may be made in any field within the purview of the Society.
  3. The work to have been largely carried out in Tasmania or under the aegis of a Tasmanian-based organization.
  4. The recipient shall be in mid-career, rapidly developing a standing in his/her field and be winning international recognition from peers.
  5. The award is to be known as the MR Banks Medal, to honour Dr M R Banks’ contribution to science and The Royal Society of Tasmania.
  6. The award to be made every one to three years.
  7. The recipient of the medal shall address the Society by delivering the M R Banks Lecture to members, after the conferring of the medal.
  • The Clive Lord Memorial Medal , Established July 1930.  A lecturer will be selected to deliver the Clive Lord Memorial Lecture,  the recipient being a scholar distinguished for research in Tasmanian Science or History.  A memorial medal will be presented.

Procedure for Nomination for the Clive Lord Memorial Medal 

The first page of the nomination should list:

  •  The name of the medal.
  •  The name of the candidate and contact address.
  •  The name of the proposer and contact address.

This should be followed by a description of the candidate’s achievements relevant to the Clive Lord Medal.  It should be no longer than one page and should be written concisely and in language that is widely understood outside the candidate’s field of research.  The candidate’s contributions to science, history or other field of learning, industry or society should be clearly stated.

A full curriculum vitae should be provided in confidence.  It should include the candidate’s date of birth, the date of receipt of degrees, and a full list of significant published works.  Where the candidate’s standing relies on co-authored papers, the candidate’s role in those significant papers should be indicated.

The Honours Committee of the Royal Society of Tasmania has limited ability to seek additional information and therefore depends on the nomination papers to provide a full and fair account of the candidate’s suitability, taking into account the criteria of the particular medal.

Applications should be addressed to the:

Dr John G. Thorne,
Convener, Honours Committee
The Royal Society of Tasmania
GPO Box 1166
HOBART TASMANIA 7001

Nominations must be received no later than August 31 2013.  

Procedure for nomination for MR Banks Medal

The first page of the nomination should list

  • The name of the medal
  • The name of the proposer and contact address
  • The name of the candidate and contact address

No self nominations are allowed

 The description of the candidate’s achievements relevant to the Medal should follow.  It should be no more than one page and should be written concisely and in language that is widely understood outside the candidate’s field of research.  The candidate’s research or other scholarly contributions to science, history or other field of learning, industry or society should be clearly stated.

A full curriculum vitae should be provided by the nominee to the nominator for the Honours Committee, in confidence.  It should include the candidate’s date of birth, the date of receipt of degrees, and a full list of published works.  The most significant publications should be highlighted (for example by asterisks).  Where the candidate’s standing relies on many co-authored papers, the candidate’s role in those significant publications should be indicated.

The Honours Committee of the Royal Society of Tasmania has limited ability to seek additional information and therefore depends on the nomination papers to provide a full and fair account of the candidate’s suitability, taking into account the criteria for the Medal.

Nominations should be sent to:

Dr John G. Thorne,
Convener, Honours Committee
The Royal Society of Tasmania
GPO Box 1166
HOBART TASMANIA 7001

Nominations must be received no later than August 31, 2013  

Procedure for nomination for The Royal Society Medal

The first page of the nomination should list

  • The name of the medal
  • The name of the proposer and contact address
  • The name of the candidate and contact address

No self nominations are allowed 

The description of the candidate’s achievements relevant to The Royal Society Medal should follow.  It should be no more than one page and should be written concisely and in language that is widey understood outside the candidate’s field of research.  The candidate’s research or other scholarly contributions to science, history or other field of learning, industry or society should be clearly stated.

A full curriculum vitae should be provided by the nominee to the nominator for the Honours Committee, in confidence.  It should include the candidate’s date of birth, the date of receipt of degrees, and a full list of published works.  The most significant publications should be highlighted (for example by asterisks).  Where the candidate’s standing relies on many co-authored papers, the candidate’s role in those significant publications should be indicated.

The Honours Committee of the Royal Society of Tasmania has limited ability to seek additional information and therefore depends on the nomination papers to provide a full and fair account of the candidate’s suitability, taking into account the criteria for the Medal.

Nominations should be sent to:

Dr John G. Thorne,
Convener, Honours Committee
The Royal Society of Tasmania
GPO Box 1166
HOBART TASMANIA 7001

Nominations must be received no later than August 31, 2013 

 

 

Advance Notice: The Royal Society has an Annual Doctoral Award and nominations for this award will be called on October 1.

Fish Health and Seafood (National Science Week special event) – 11 August 2013

The RST Northern Chapter has organized a special event for National Science Week to highlight work currently being carried out by scientists in Tasmania.

Fish Health and Seafood

Fish Health and Seafood will presented by three speakers from the National Centre for Marine Conservation and Resource Sustainability, University of Tasmania, Launceston in the:

Meeting Room, QVMAG at Inveresk at 2pm Sunday 11 August 2013

RSVP bookings@qvmag.tas.gov.au

see attachment below for further details

RST NatSciWk Lecture

Welcome to our new website

Welcome to the new website of The Royal Society of Tasmania.

The Royal Society of Tasmania is the oldest scientific society in Australia and New Zealand and the third oldest Royal Society in the Commonwealth.

The Society was founded in 1843 by Sir John Eardley-Wilmot, Lieutenant Governor, as the Botanical and Horticultural Society of Van Diemen’s Land. Its aim was to ‘develop the physical character of the Island and illustrate its natural history and productions’.

Queen Victoria became Patron in 1844 and the name was changed to The Royal Society of Tasmania of Van Diemen’s Land for Horticulture, Botany and the Advancement of Science. Under the current relevant Act of Parliament, passed in 1911, the name was shortened to The Royal Society of Tasmania. A branch of the Society was formed in Launceston in 1853. It lapsed but was reconstituted in 1921 and has continued since then.

In its early years, the Society established the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens. It also began building up substantial collections of both art and natural history specimens, all housed in The Royal Society of Tasmania Museum. These collections became the basis of the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery when, in 1885, the Society gave them to the Government, reserving ownership only of mostly works on paper. In 1965, these remaining works – some 700 – were placed on long-term loan with the state institution.

The Society also built up a substantial Library which is now housed in the Morris Miller Library in the University of Tasmania.