You are viewing an archived copy of this website captured Mon Aug 07 10:55:01 AEST 2017
Sections
You are here: Home Get Involved How To Help Prevent Didymo

Prevent Didymo

Didymo (Didymosphenia geminata), also called Rock Snot, is a freshwater alga that is widespread in the Northern Hemisphere. Although not present in Australia, it is considered a significant pest, being highly invasive, and is prohibited from entry to Tasmania.

Didymo (Didymosphenia geminata), also called Rock Snot, is a freshwater alga that is widespread in the Northern Hemisphere. Although not present in Australia, it is considered a significant pest, being highly invasive, and is prohibited from entry to Tasmania.

Declare used fishing gear at Quarantine entry points

The Government is working to prevent the introduction of didymo to Australia at Quarantine entry points. Anglers who are visiting Australia or returning home from a fishing trip overseas, are now required to declare all used fishing equipment for inspection. Any potentially contaminated fishing or other freshwater recreational equipment will be confiscated and treated by Quarantine staff.

Check-Clean-Dry Anything that’s been in freshwater

  • Check your gear before leaving the waterway and remove visible clumps of algae or other weeds.
  • Clean your gear by scrubbing and soaking all items for a minimum of one minute in a 2% solution of household bleach (200 ml bleach with added water to make 10 litres) or a 5% salt, nappy or antiseptic cleaner or dishwashing detergent solution. As a greater precaution, use a hot water solution and soak for 30 minutes, and for items that are difficult to clean and dry (like felt-soled boots), soak for 45 minutes in water maintained at 45 degrees or higher containing 5% household bleach, dishwashing liquid or nappy cleaner. Discharge cleaning waste away from waterways.
  • Dry your gear completely and wait an additional 48 hours before contact or use in another waterway. Remember that some materials such as felt soled boots may need much longer, even several weeks to dry. Treatment using hot air at 450C for at least 40 minutes is a faster alternative when available.

For more information, visit www.biosecurity.govt.nz/didymo